#nice

AIDS is a battle yet to be won: Review of The Normal Heart

Director: Ryan Murphy
Screenplay: Larry Kramer
Cast: Mark Ruffalo, Julia Roberts, Matt Bomer, Taylor Kitsch, Jim Parsons, Joe Mantello, Jonathan Groff, Alfred Molina

2

The timing of The Normal Heart’s television premiere couldn’t be more perfect: it was shown at a time when AIDS cases are gradually but steadily increasing in the Asia-Pacific region. And although AIDS may not be the biggest problem of most countries in the West right now, it remains a situation that is still left unresolved.

The Normal Heart has reminded us of the brutal reality that AIDS is still something we must fear. (more…)

Advertisements

Submarine is a subtle charmer

mfctoplist_header-may-2014

Director: Richard Ayoade
Screenplay by: Richard Ayoade
Cast: Craign Roberts, Yasmin Paige, Noah Taylor, Paddy Considine, Sally Hawkins

I came to know about Submarine because I was (and still am) obsessed with Alex Turner and the Arctic Monkeys. I found out that there was this coming-of-age film with a soundtrack written entirely by Alex Turner during the pre-Suck It And See era; it signified the change in sound Arctic Monkeys was headed towards, from its indie rock garage band roots.

Image

(more…)

Days of Future Past is a smart, worthy addition to the X-Men canon

Director: Bryan Singer
Screenplay:
 Simon Kinberg 
Cast: 
Hugh Jackman, James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Jennifer Lawrence, Halle Berry, Anna Paquin, Ellen Page, Peter Dinklage, Ian McKellen, Patrick Stewart

The scandalous allegations plaguing Director Bryan Singer aren’t enough to deny the fact that X-Men: Days of Future Past is a sleek, bold and intelligent film that can go down as one of the finest superhero films in history.

4

(more…)

Godzilla marks the kaiju king’s return in fighting form

Director: Gareth Edwards
Screenplay: Max Borenstein
Cast:  Bryan Cranston, Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Ken Watanabe, Elizabeth Olsen, Juliette Binoche, Sally Hawkins, David Strathairn

2

There’s a good reason why many of us are apprehensive about the new Godzilla movie: we’ve had our fair share of bad flicks adapted from the so-called king of all kaijus. The perfect example of this would be the godawful 1998 franchise whose only achievement was casting the (still) dreamy Matthew Broderick.

So how did Godzilla’s return to the big screen fare? To put it mildly, like the titular character at the end of the film, it reigned supreme. (more…)

Show to watch out for: Gotham shows the dark history behind the notorious city

Move over, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., another comic book-based tv show is here to shake up the competition.

Fox’s Gotham has been under our radar for quite sometime already but it was not until we’ve watched the newly-released trailer did we become fully convinced that it may be actually be something to watch out for.

The trailer sets off some darkly noir vibes set in the infamous city that’s arguably the most notorious in all of comic universe.

(more…)

Game of Thrones recap: Littlefinger is the real enemy

Following the creepy White Walker reveal in the last episode, Game of Thrones returns this week with a coronation, confrontations and several killings. Because a Game of Thrones episode without a murder scene is considered a dull affair (See what I did there?).

Tommen Baratheon’s coronation opened the episode. Throughout the celebration, our boy king could not keep his eyes away from Margaery Tyrell who stands proximate to His Grace as he welcomes his well-wishers.  Tommen and Margaery’s flirtatious glances caught the attention of Queen Regent Cersei Lannister who immediately went out to confront the recently-widowed.

1

(more…)

Wes Anderson’s grandest film yet: Reviewing The Grand Budapest Hotel

Director: Wes Anderson
Screenplay: Wes Anderson
Cast: Ralph Fiennes, F. Murray Abraham, Mathieu Amalric, Adrien Brody, Willem Dafoe, Jeff Goldblum, Harvey Keitel, Jude Law, Bill Murray, Edward Norton, Saoirse Ronan, Jason Schwartzman, Tilda Swinton, Owen Wilson, Tony Revolori, Léa Seydoux

mfc_grandbudapest_1

I remember seeing the music video of Vampire Weekend’s Oxford Comma for the first time and thinking that it was reminiscent of the Wes Anderson aesthetic – the chapters, the way the camera pans from one scene to another for the entire duration of the video, and even the preppy outfits. The message of the song was revealed in the manner by which Wes Anderson would have told an audience of the story of one of his films; perhaps Wes Anderson’s quirky visuals and alternate realities are not just what constitute his approach to filmmaking, but something that has been established as a distinct brand of storytelling. But in The Grand Budapest Hotel, Anderson takes this aesthetic to a whole new level, without sparing the plot of the movie from the revolutionary grandeur he took in his stride.

(more…)

Game of Thrones recap: Postmortem

In some ways, it’s pointless to debate how a hugely successful TV series deviated from its resource material. A franchise so widely accepted such as Game of Thrones would be watched and would be reviewed, would be gif-ed and meme-d regardless of whether the fans of the book dished their stamp of approval. Nonetheless, there are lines that shouldn’t be crossed.

But let’s not get ahead of ourselves.

7

(more…)

Game of Thrones recap: A (purplish) wedding and a funeral

Those who have read the A Song of Ice and Fire (ASOIAF) books know that King Joffrey Baratheon and Margaery Tyrell’s nuptial, or the Purple Wedding as it is fondly called by fans, will be one of this season’s highlights. Honestly, I was expecting to see it during the fourth or fifth episode because after the said wedding, the showrunners are left with only few materials to work with for this season. Remember that this season of Game of Thrones is based just on the second half of ASOIAF’s third book and not on its fourth (the fourth and fifth books, I believe, will be told in seasons five and six).

The Purple Wedding being shown in the second episode is tantamount to HBO declaring that there are a lot more to expect this year. So to my fellow fans, we better be prepared for what’s in store for us in the remaining eight episodes.

6
And here goes the recap:

(more…)

What has become of high school stereotypes? Revisiting The Breakfast Club

mfctoplist_header-apr-2014

Director: John Hughes
Screenplay: John Hughes
Cinematography: Thomas Del Ruth
Cast: Molly Ringwald, Judd Nelson, Anthony Michael Hall, Ally Sheedy, Emilio Estevez

What hasn’t been said about The Breakfast Club? It is the quintessential high school film that effectively translated the inner turmoil of a high school teen into a glorious 97-minute story that everyone can understand and relate to. It is the precursor of teen movies, taking its root in the successful formula: that is to deconstruct the archetypal roles seen in high school. More recent teen movies, such as Pitch Perfect and Easy A, pay homage to this movie, and who can blame them? The glory of the high school movie genre began with The Breakfast Club.

The-Breakfast-Club
The premise is simple: five high school students went to school on a Saturday to serve detention, namely Brian Johnson (Anthony Michael Hall), the Brain; Andy Clark (Emilio Estevez), the Athlete; Bender (Judd Nelson), the Criminal; Allison Reynolds (Ally Sheedy), the Basket Case; and Claire Standish (Molly Ringwald), the Princess. They are all kept in a room, and considering their different backgrounds (in high school, it was more like a caste system), they didn’t get along with each other so well. The audience is given a glimpse into each one’s quirks, most of which were compatible with their own social labels – nothing surprising there. The dandruff scene is comedy gold. But what made the movie an essential high school movie is how it played with the stereotypes, not just with deconstruction, but also with how one stereotype interacted with another. Locked in one room from 7 AM to 4 PM, will they all come out alive? The alternative of their pulling a Battle Royale might be epic, too, now that I think about it, but what happened in that room, and how they changed each other is more significant.

(more…)